Tag Archives: african american

Black History Month: Reaching Out

We are pleased to bring you a guest post from National CASA’s diversity manager, Tracy Evans.


Black History Month: Reaching OutWhile Black History Month officially ends at 12:01 am on March 1, black history is something to be embraced and honored year-round. Awareness periods such as Black History Month offer special opportunities to celebrate the history, accomplishments, challenges and the uniqueness of communities that have historically been under-recognized. They also provide a chance to connect and engage with people from other races, ethnicities and cultures. Here are three suggestions:

 

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The Origins of Black History Month

We are pleased to bring you a guest post from National CASA’s diversity manager, Tracy Evans.


The Origins of Black History MonthTo understand the history of Black History Month, we have to look back to the summer of 1915, fifty years after the Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution abolished slavery and involuntary servitude. The city of Chicago had sponsored a celebration of the anniversary of emancipation, and Carter G. Woodson and thousands of other African Americans traveled from across the country to see exhibits highlighting the progress their people had made since the destruction of slavery. Despite being held at the Chicago Coliseum—the site of the 1912 Republican convention—an overflow crowd of six to twelve thousand people waited outside for their turn to view the exhibits. Inspired by the three-week celebration, Woodson decided to form an organization to promote the scientific study of black life and history.

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Black History Month: History Is Still Being Made

Black History Month: History Is Still Being Made

Reproduction of a photograph depicting the Oberlin Rescuers at the Cuyahoga County Jail in April 1859. Image courtesy of the Ohio Historical Society.

I remember seeing this photograph for the first time as a child growing up in Oberlin, OH. The men depicted were part of a contingent of residents—white and black, young and old—who took part in the rescue of an escaped slave who had been caught by federal marshals. The crowd outside the hotel where the man was being held eventually grew to hundreds of townspeople, and John Price was freed and spirited away to Canada.

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